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Steve Peirce,     Uniontown, OH    revspyder1@earthlink.net            1/4/2003

1 Cylinder, 4 cycle, Hit and Miss, .580 bore X .750 stroke

Click here to go to the finished engine.

This is the First I.C. Engine I have worked on that may actually RUN! This only the second engine I have built and is almost completely my own design. Not sure how well it will run or even if it will run at all! But, it will still look good on my shelf and I am sure learning a lot along the way! (Thanks to all the help I have received from the group!) After many years of looking at other engines of this type I decided to go for it. This is a single cylinder ,4 stroke internal combustion engine. Water cooled Hit or miss style. It has a .580 Bore and .750 stroke. Steel cylinder, aluminum piston with Cast Iron rings. Spark Plug ignition. 2 7/8 Dia. Fly wheels that are Bronze with Aluminum rings pressed over them. I was hoping to have it running for Cabin Fever in January, but Probably not going to make it but will be close. Either way I will have it at the show. Keep your fingers Crossed!

1/5/2003  Started on the WICO EK trip mag tonight. It is static and not functional , but will have a small trigger that will trip off the exhaust valve rod and the wire to the spark plug will come threw the Mag to look as if it functions (to the novice anyway!)

 

 

Finished Oiler and Grease cups.

1/12/2003  

 I decided to scale down a Carburetor I built 16 years ago for an engine that was never completed. Pictured here is the new and old Carbs. The old Carb is "the Carb that ended my career" as a machinist. Long story. The new Carb is aprox. .375 Dia. at the air breather and .100 venturi, I may have to play with the Venturi size some once the engine reaches the running phase.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I now have the Muffler done and the head ported for the Carburetor and exhaust pipe. Also the spark plug is in. Now I just need the valves, rocker arm,springs,crank,connecting rod,belt pulleys and a hand full of indescribable intricate bobbles. then I can move onto the electrics! Still have a long way to go don't I?
 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/14/2003  One of our members donated his time and equipment and made me water slide decals for my Wico EK mag. A special thanks to him. Here are the latest pictures and really

 

2/1/2003

I made up a Mandrel for winding my springs from 1/8 brass round.  Center drilled one end and drilled a #60 hole thru to start my winding. To keep the wire out of my way I used some flat magnets to keep it under control. I drilled a small hole at an angle thru my Exacto Knife handle to feed my wire. My Sherline lathe has no feed , so springs were wound carefully by hand. My springs are 1/8 ID. .010 music wire for the  intake spring and .020 wire for the exhaust. after winding ,setting the free length and grinding the ends to be flat and flush I wrapped them in foil and placed them in the oven at 500 degrees for an hour.
 
With my springs wound I started on my Valves and Keepers. The keepers are press fit and will in the future probably need a little lock tight, but for now I will be lucky to get them off again! I also took Bob Shores advise and cut a small inset in the back of the head to recess the valves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I decided next to get started on the Ignition. I am using a TIM-6 with a HAL sensor.
 
Once most of the ignition was done being soldered I set it aside and got started on , for me, one of the most difficult parts on my engine. The Rocker arm and Bracket. Since I am using my full scale 3 1/2 H.P. 1928 Jeager for a model I wanted the look of a Cast Rocker arm. Between the Arm , Bracket and fasteners there are 14 pieces to this assembly. The bulk of the arm assembly had to be shaped by hand with a small file. After 3 days it's done. 14 small parts and still have to make the rod Clevis End! No rest for the weary!
 

 

decided next to get started on the Ignition. I am using a TIM-6 with a HAL sensor.
 
Once most of the ignition was done being soldered I set it aside and got started on , for me, one of the most difficult parts on my engine. The Rocker arm and Bracket. Since I am using my full scale 3 1/2 H.P. 1928 Jeager for a model I wanted the look of a Cast Rocker arm. Between the Arm , Bracket and fasteners there are 14 pieces to this assembly. The bulk of the arm assembly had to be shaped by hand with a small file. After 3 days it's done. 14 small parts and still have to make the rod Clevis End!
 

I am using .030 Teflon for the head gasket as recommended by Bob Shores.
  Also you are going to laugh at me! I was so concerned with the action of the rocker arm and not having any binding and such I never set the timing and it was opening during the compression stroke. Silly me! any tips on when the timing should be set in degrees. Also after setting the timing closer to appropriate I set the crank in my lathe chuck and set the rpm to 100 and listened to the engine. very impressive since it sounds as thou it is running quit well hit and miss Ka, ticka, ticka ,ticka, pop! unfortunately it is not designed as a hit and miss, but in touching the intake valve every three or four revelations it pops, so it might have too much spring tension and seems to be building vacuum.
  As for the head gasket I punched the center with a brass tube with the end sharpened, like wise the bolt holes were punched. then the gasket was placed in a mandrel and the outside was cut down.

 
   Since one of the guys was kind enough to send me some Corian to make spark plugs eventually I will have to get to it. This means I will have to yank the Corian out from under my engine. so, I decided to build a oak cart for the engine. I have always liked the look of round spoke brass wheels on an engine cart and since I have never talked to anyone about how to make them I decided to wing it and share the results with the group. Any feed back or ideas are always welcome.
  To start I took a length of thin wall brass tube and cut it with a tubing cutter, since my bandsaw tends not to cut tubing very strait. Since thin wall tubing is easily compressed out of round in a three jaw chuck on my lathe, I machines an insert to press into the tubing. A piece of blue metal flake bowling ball I had lying around from when I was a pin mechanic worked out nicely. Blue flake bowling balls make real nice looking flywheels by the way!
 With my insert in place I trimmed 4 pieces of brass tube down to width and set them aside.

 

 I then chucked up some brass and turned four Hubs for the wheels. I machined an Aluminum Jig with a pin in the center to hold the hub and a raised ring to hold the ring of tubing for soldering later. I also made a small mandrel to hold the Hubs when drilling dimples for the spokes.

 

I did a little poor mans layout on the hubs and mandrel with a black magic marked and scribed a line down the side of each hub and a line on the mandrel at 0 degrees. This was to avoid having to move the table on my mill as 4 spokes will be set in the front of the hub and 45 degrees off 4 will be set at the rear. By doing this I could drill 4 dimples at 90 degrees from each other, remove the Hub at 0 degrees turn it around, line it up move off 45 degrees and drill the other four 90 degrees off from that. I did it this way since I have four to do it was quicker then moving the table in and out each time. After picking up my center width wise I moved in .125 from the end and using a large center drill spotted my dimples about .015 deep.
 Next I chucked my rings with insert into the chuck mounted to my rotary table and since I was already on center , I picked up my edge and moved in half of the width of my rings and drilled 8 holes around in the center. My spokes were made from 1/16 brass round but they were actually about .070 and I drilled my holes about .010 larger since I wanted the spokes to go thru at an angle to meet my front and rear dimples in the Hub. Now as you can see from one of the pictures, a three jaw chuck didn't allow me room to drill all 8 as some I would have had to drill thru the chuck jaws. I simply drilled the ones I could until I went around to zero loosened the chuck and rotated the ring 45 degrees and used my center drill to line it up with the next in line I had drilled and went back around and hit the ones I missed the first time around.
 After my rings and hubs were drilled I placed the hubs on a piece of brass tubing and tined the dimples with soft rosin core solder.

 

 After tinning the hubs I placed one on the soldering jig with a ring and placed 8 pre cut spokes in the holes about half way. I cut the spokes about a 1/16 th inch long. with the spokes hanging in the ring I went around and tined the ends. I think tinning the ends and Hubs makes it easier as heating the parts up to temp for soldering in the jig will tend to heat the jig and will hold too much heat, resulting in one spoke falling loose as you try to place another. With them tined ahead I could go one at a time and wave my torch over it a few times and get it to stick without heating it to the point they all are liquid. With all tined I started with lower spokes one at a time and worked my way to the top spokes. At this point they are not held well, but once they are spotted to the hub I could go around and solder the ends to the ring, once that was done, I took a wet paper towel and wrapped it around the ring and reheated the hub to get a good solder to the spokes there without them falling out.
  Once cooled I filed off the excess spoke sticking out of the rim.
 

 

With the excess filed off I remounted my 3 jaw chuck on my lathe and mounted each wheel back on the mandrel for the hubs and sanded the polished the rims. A quick coat of paint and WahLa! My Cart wheels are done! I don't think they will look very good mounted to my Corian Base, so back to the shop! No rest for the weary!

 

 
  Oh and here is a picture of my Bowling Ball Flywheel!

i have finaly finished the axles for my engine cart, all that is left is to stain , varnish and attach to the cart frame. I decided to go with a steering system instead of just having the axle turn.

2/20/2003 

The cart is just about done. All that is left is to mount the fuel tank and build the coil box lid, tool box, and brass rack for the Chock Blocks.
  When I was at Cabin Fever I fell in love with Bob Shores little 50 gallon drum style fuel tank, so I went with it. Fuel tank float gage sight glass was made from a plastic Insulin needle. I used some metal polish to gently remove the "cc" measurements and imprinted "warning insulin use only" from the tube. I plan to use a cork for the float attached to thin aluminum tube with a red tip to read level in the gage glass.

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2003,  Florida Association of Model Engineers and engine builder as noted above, All rights reserved.